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Human Rights & Social Issues

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Japanese people hate China more than ever


People in Japan overwhelmingly have a poor opinion of China and vice versa, according to new polls, although Chinese views of Japan have become slightly less chilly. The percentage of Japanese respondents who said they had a negative impression of China increased to 93% from 90% a year earlier, according to a poll by Genron NPO, … Continue reading

Do the Chinese love China?


The following are the views of a Chinese netizen: Do the Chinese love China? For this question, the answer is easy – no! Perhaps you are shocked by seeing my answer because you may think the Chinese are really united and they often refute the criticism from other countries, especially western countries. But I am … Continue reading

The Uighur people: In defence of the minority, their identity and autonomy


I am writing to bring to the attention of the world the horrible condition of the Uighur people and to highlight the persecution and oppression that they are undergoing under the Chinese Empire. Who are the Uighurs? According to the BBC report of the same title, April 30, 2014: “China’s western Xinjiang region has a … Continue reading

China’s Silent War on Terror


On a clear, sunny morning last October in Beijing, an S.U.V. carrying three people turned right on to Chang’an Avenue, plowed through crowds gathered near the entrance to the Forbidden City and burst into flames at northern edge of Tiananmen Square. The wreck killed five people, including three in the vehicle and two bystanders. Dozens more were … Continue reading

Pope tells Asia’s communist nations not to fear Christians


Pope Francis, in remarks clearly intended for communist-ruled countries such as China, North Korea and Vietnam, said on Sunday that Asian governments should not fear Christians as they did not want to “come as conquerors” but be integral parts of local cultures. Francis made his comments, some of them unscripted, in an address to about … Continue reading

The Great Chinese Exodus; 64% of China’s rich plan to leave


Many Chinese are leaving for cleaner air, better schools and more opportunity. But Beijing is keeping its eye on them. Even when the emperors did their utmost to keep them at home, the Chinese ventured overseas in search of knowledge, fortune and adventure. Manchu Qing rulers thought those who left must be criminals or conspirators … Continue reading

Chinese people’s bad behaviour causes poor image in Africa, negative international rating


It’s perhaps coincidence, but Reuters’ report on China’s Xi Jinping not making global impact comes on the same day when Hong Kong newspapers SCMP and Ta Kung Pao report on China’s poor image in Africa due to Chinese people and companies’ behaviour there. Ta Kung Pao says in its report as an increasing number of … Continue reading

China, Hong Kong and Cantonese: Dialect dialectic


What I’ve learned from conversations with bloggers and others who are Chinese language speakers, and therefore have a stake in this, is that even thoughtful Chinese people have unwittingly accepted very authoritarian definitions of language and dialect: only officially recognised languages are language, and everything else is dialect.  When one says Cantonese is not a … Continue reading

The battle against China for Hong Kong’s soul


Hong Kong was regarded as a goose that laid gold eggs when it was handed back to China. The “One Country Two Systems” policy aims at maintaining the goose’s ability to lay golden eggs for China. It has never been aimed at allowing the goose independence to fly away from China. Having this basic in … Continue reading

Do Hong Kongers speak a language?


“Cantonese is just a dialect, it’s not a language.” I’ve heard this meme many times since coming to Hong Kong four years ago. They always say it as if it’s some sort of linguistic fact. My interest here is in the ability of this meme to spread, not in its truth. But given how much … Continue reading

Chinese government’s further attack on Islam as Ramadan fasting is banned


A number of government departments in China’s Xinjiang province have banned Muslim staff from observing the fast during the month of Ramadan in yet another attack on the rights of the country’s religious minorities. Activists have accused Beijing of exaggerating the threat from the country’s Muslim Uighur separatists to justify a crackdown on the religious … Continue reading

China’s last foot-binding survivors


Foot binding, the cruel practice of mutilating the feet of young girls, was once pervasive in turn-of-the-century China, where it was seen as a sign of wealth and marriage eligibility. For a millennium—from the 10th to 20th centuries—the practice flourished on and off, deeply ingrained in Chinese society. Even after it was outlawed in 1912, … Continue reading

Huge crowds turn out to call for democracy in Hong Kong


Tens of thousands of Hong Kongers have joined pro-democracy protests on the streets of the Chinese territory in a massive show of defiance against Beijing’s vision for the city’s political future. Pro-democracy protests on July 1 — the anniversary of the 1997 handover of the former British colony to China — are an annual event … Continue reading

Top China official met by protests in Taiwan, called “communist bandit”


China’s top official in charge of relations with self-ruled Taiwan said on Friday that he understood and respected the choices of its people, as he was met by noisy protests in the traditionally anti-China far south of the island. Zhang Zhijun, director of China’s Taiwan Affairs Office, is making the first trip by the head … Continue reading

China’s police given guns; irresponsible shootings result


A string of shooting incidents involving Chinese police — leaving at least four people dead — has the public wondering if its rank-and-file police force is really ready to carry guns, as mandated by new regulations. Last month, two policemen brought a loaded gun to a kindergarten show-and-tell. The handgun mistakenly went off, injuring four … Continue reading

Shanghai women’s liberal views on sex during the Mao Era; beginnings of the illicit sex industry


The following stories are first-hand recollections of life in China during the years immediately after the Communists took power (1949-1951). They are written by Chan Kai Yee, author of Tiananmen‘s Tremendous Achievements (see link in right sidebar). We would recommend this book for those interested in more first-hand perspectives of life in China, particularly the … Continue reading

Dating and marriage in China soon after the Communist takeover (part 1)


The following stories are first-hand recollections of life in China during the years immediately after the Communists took power (1949-1951). They are written by Chan Kai Yee, author of Tiananmen‘s Tremendous Achievements (see link in right sidebar). We would recommend this book for those interested in more first-hand perspectives of life in China, particularly the … Continue reading

Hong Kong has nothing to learn from China, but China has much to learn from Hong Kong


Perhaps the 1995 rumours of the death of Hong Kong weren’t exaggerated after all. Nineteen years ago this month, Fortune ran its infamous “Death of Hong Kong” cover. By 2007, the magazine had changed its tune, deciding, in the Mark Twain sense, that it had been “wrong” and that “reports of Hong Kong’s death have … Continue reading

Hong Kong: 600,000 defy China in ‘vote’ for democracy


Nearly 600,000 votes have been cast in three days of an unofficial referendum on democratic reforms in Hong Kong, part of a civil campaign that has been branded illegal by the former British colony and by Communist Party authorities in Beijing. Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule in 1997 with wide-ranging autonomy under the formula … Continue reading

A showdown is looming in Hong Kong, with China threatening to send in its army


For years after the return of Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, China’s leaders surprised the world by adhering scrupulously to Hong Kong’s unusual political set-up of “one country, two systems”. Under the terms of the handover, Hong Kong was to retain a high degree of autonomy for 50 years, an ingenious solution for … Continue reading

The Cham: Vietnam’s descendants of ancient rulers of South China Sea


In Vietnam, roughly 160,000 members of the Cham ethnic minority, whose forebears dominated the South China Sea for more than a millennium, are quietly watching on the sidelines of the escalating conflict in the waters they may have a historical claim to: Tensions in the South China Sea reignited last month, when China deployed a … Continue reading

China threatens to remove Hong Kong’s autonomy


Macquarie Group has cautioned against investing in Hong Kong companies which are exposed to the political winds of mainland China, following an official warning that the city’s administrative “autonomy” is a privilege that can be removed at any time. Hong Kong has retained its status as the financial hub of Asia since its handover from … Continue reading

China uses D-Day anniversary to praise Germany, slam Japan


China used the 70th anniversary of World War Two‘s D-Day landings on Friday to praise Germany for its contrition over its wartime past and slam Japan for what Beijing views as Tokyo‘s continued denial of its brutal history. China has increasingly contrasted Germany and its public remorse for the Nazi regime to Japan, where repeated … Continue reading

Hong Kong recalls Tiananmen killings, China muffles dissent


Tens of thousands of people held a candlelight vigil in Hong Kong on Wednesday to mark the bloody crackdown on pro-democracy protesters 25 years ago in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, while mainland China authorities sought to whitewash the 1989 event. In Beijing, police flooded the streets around the square, scene of the worst of the violence … Continue reading

China: The world remembers Tiananmen massacre 25 years later


Here’s an uncomfortable truth confronting Chinese President Xi Jinping: It’s 2014, but the pro-democracy, pro-rights sentiments that manifested across China as demonstrations in 1989 are still alive and well. For 25 years, the Chinese government has tried to expunge the June 4, 1989, Tiananmen massacre from history to deny people inside the country any knowledge … Continue reading

The homophobia of China’s Communist Party; vilifies eChinacities owner on his own website


Disappointingly, homophobia is alive and thriving in China, and actively incited by China’s ruling Communist Party. It seems that even loyal party members are not exempt. George Xu, founder and owner of the expat website eChinacities, seems to be the latest victim. For some time, China Daily Mail has expressed concern over expat websites being … Continue reading

China’s paranoia: SWAT given ‘shoot on sight’ orders; commuters frisked as Beijing heightens anti-terror measures


Beijing subjected rush-hour passengers to an extra layer of security checks and gave orders allowing SWAT teams to shoot terrorists on sight, as it ramped up policing after a string of attacks on the mainland. This morning, hundreds of passengers queued up in security lines outside nine key subway stations in Beijing, where metro staff … Continue reading

Seven big problems that China’s large economy can’t solve


China may have topped the U.S. as the world’s largest economy, at least according to the World Bank, but how does that help the country? Here are seven problems China faces that its top ranking will not solve: Corruption China continues to crack down on corruption involving state officials enriching themselves through bloated government projects … Continue reading

Blasts kill dozens at market in China’s restive Xinjiang region


A series of explosions tore through an open-air market in the capital of the volatile western Chinese region of Xinjiang on Thursday, killing dozens of people and wounding many more, state media reported. China’s Ministry of Public Security said the attack in the heavily policed city of Urumqi was “a serious violent terrorist incident” and … Continue reading

Taiwan: Ma tax scandal could suggest prejudice, concern


The Taipei Times has noted new claims and information about a tax scandal orbiting Taiwan President Ma (馬英九). The article from the previous day was in response to a Next Magazine article explaining that Ma may be liable for at least $1 million USD in taxes owed to the IRS. Ma was not accused of cheating on his tax returns; he has simply been mentioned by an … Continue reading

Vietnam mobs set fire to foreign factories in anti-China protest


Thousands of Vietnamese set fire to factories and rampaged in industrial zones in the south of the country after protests against Chinese oil drilling in a part of the South China Sea claimed by Vietnam, officials said on Wednesday. The brunt appears to have been borne by Taiwanese companies in the zones in Binh Duong … Continue reading

China deserves Nobel Peace Prize for lifting its population out of poverty, Norway’s richest man says


Media censorship, journalist detention, and a host of other human-rights problems aside, China deserves a Nobel Peace Prize for lifting one-fifth of the world’s population out of poverty, said Norway’s richest man on Wednesday. Stein Erik Hagen, chairman of Norwegian conglomerate Orkla Asa, told Norwegian newspaper VG that China should qualify for the Nobel Peace … Continue reading

The mystery shrouding China’s Communist Party suicides


Being a government official in China is not for the faint of heart, the thin-skinned or the fragile of mind. A recent state media report has reverberated online and in the Communist Party press by revealing that at least 54 Chinese officials died of “unnatural causes” in 2013, and that more than 40 percent of … Continue reading

China’s CCP shows its fear ahead of 25th anniversary of Tiananmen Massacre


At the beginning of my book “Tiananmen’s Tremendous Achievements,” I cite the Chinese saying “Once bitten by a snake, one is scared all one’s life at the mere sight of a snake,” to describe the pervasive fear of collapse in the party, and call the fear CCP’s Tiananmen syndrome. In the book, there is also … Continue reading

Taiwan: Sunflower movement demonstrators face persecution


In addition to retaliation from the police (and possibly from the judiciary), persecution and character assassination of those associated with protests has taken on many forms. Those following our fan page and recent events in Taiwan will no doubt be aware of the abuse of power by police. The arrest, interrogation and subsequent release of … Continue reading

China points to suicide blast in Urumqi attack


Chinese authorities say that two religious extremists carried out a terror attack at a train station in far-western Xinjiang region by detonating explosives, in an apparent suicide bombing that also killed one other person and wounded 79. The strike late Wednesday in Urumqi was the third high-profile attack in seven months blamed on Xinjiang extremists … Continue reading

Taiwan demonstrations continue: western media forgets


As the Sunflower Movement stated upon leaving Taiwan‘s legislative chamber, they would return. The movement never had “tunnel vision”, but was focused on a long list of grievances. The secret “black box” trade negotiation between China and US Military ally Taiwan was only the one straw on the camel’s back. In this recent round of government … Continue reading

China claims “terrorism” threats in apparent bid to get tougher on ethnic minorities


Chinese President Xi Jinping said on Saturday that China faces increasing threats to national security and warned of the dangers of terrorism in a speech indicating that Beijing could impose tougher controls on its ethnic minorities. Xi told a study session of the party’s decision-making Politburo “to resolutely stamp out the brazenness of the terrorists,” … Continue reading

Norway’s shame: Shuns Dalai Lama, bows to China’s bullying


Norway’s ruling politicians may refuse to meet with the Dalai Lama when he visits Oslo next month to avoid angering China. The hesitation is part of an effort to ease tensions with the world’s second-largest economy that have festered since Norway’s Nobel committee awarded jailed Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo the Peace Prize in 2010. “We … Continue reading

‘Sunflower’ students change history


Read the new eBook about the last 21 hours of the Sunflower Movement occupancy. The Sunflower movement made history this month. As Taiwan’s government was deviating from the will of its people, unarmed students disrupted the legislature by occupying it for three weeks. An unplanned, flash-mob protest met outside the legislature on March 18. Both the students … Continue reading

China tries to stop Hong Kong building Tiananmen Square Museum


The world’s first permanent museum dedicated to China’s Tiananmen Square massacre is hoping to open – sparking tensions in host city Hong Kong. The planned opening comes ahead of a key anniversary of the bloody crackdown, which saw hundreds killed when Chinese troops opened fire on pro-democracy protesters, on June 3/4, 1989. But the bid … Continue reading

Twenty-five years later, Tiananmen Square no less taboo for China’s censors


Twenty-five years ago today, Chinese college students in Beijing, Shanghai, and Xi’an began gathering to publicly mourn the death of a purged high-level official, Hu Yaobang. A week later, thousands of students marched into Tiananmen Square for Hu’s funeral. The demonstrations escalated, culminating in the tragic military crackdown on the students on June 4, 1989 … Continue reading

Britain says China calls off human rights talks at last minute


China has called off talks with Britain on Beijing’s human rights record, the British government said on Monday, four days after Britain published a list of concerns. Chinese and British officials had been due to hold a round of the bilateral Human Rights Dialogue in London on Wednesday after they agreed to restart the regular … Continue reading

Taiwan’s ‘White Justice’ Breeds Confusion


Reporting 250,000+ “likes” on a suspicious Facebook page and 500 affirming phone calls for a police chief, Fang Yang-ning (方仰寧), on an island of with 23 million people is not newsworthy. Yet, it is being disseminated by the government and being reported in the Taipei Times. This actually suggests that authorities possess undisclosed research data that indicates government support is … Continue reading

Taiwan’s Jiang could face international trial for using force on ‘Sunflower’ movement protesters; executive-legislative conflict indicates rising dictators


After keeping their promise to Taiwan Legislative Yuan Speaker, Wang Jin-pyng (王金平), the students in the “Sunflower” movement who had occupied the nation’s legislature since March 19 demonstrated evidence that contradicts a long-standing, worldwide precedent in court rulings, police action, and decisions made by executive heads of state. This incident may be history’s first evidence, … Continue reading

China recruits ‘guardian angels’ to protect embattled doctors


China’s capital Beijing is taking a novel approach to protecting doctors from growing levels of violence from angry patients: volunteer “guardian angels”. The campaign will recruit students, medical workers and other patients to act as middlemen between doctors and those in their care to defuse disagreements and smooth over tensions, the official Xinhua news agency … Continue reading

Sunflower students to leave Taiwan’s legislature Thursday


Taiwan legislative Speaker Wang Jin-pyng (王金平) announced this morning that he would conduct no further discussions in the legislature concerning trade with China until a new law was passed providing oversight affecting all international trade agreements. This type of legislation, supporting the DPP (民進黨) and Sunflower movement’s request for transparency, would be a significant change in Taiwan’s legislative process. … Continue reading

Sunflower Movement: A day on the ground in Taiwan protest (photos)


The sun sets on several thousand gathered in Taipei. Police stand guard with riot shields and batons blocking roads and entrances. Streets overflow with students—some standing, most sitting on cardboard, Mylar heat blankets, or interlocking foam pads. Tents and booths line walkways. Traditional Taiwanese food vendors sit at the outskirts. Projection screens and stages can … Continue reading

College students are China’s hope for democracy; Over 100,000 protest in Taiwan


We Chinese are proud of our college students. They are the driving force of Chinese history. See how similar the Taiwan college students’ campaign to defend Taiwan’s democracy is to the Chinese college students’ campaign for democracy at Tiananmen Square 25 years ago. They are so disciplined and well-organised, strong but peaceful. They are so … Continue reading

Persuading China’s communists to give up power is like trying to persuade a tiger to give you it’s skin


I once said that trying to persuade the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) to give up its monopoly of state power is like trying to persuade a tiger to give you its skin. It is utterly impossible. In my book “Tiananmen’s Tremendous Achievements,” I said: “Due to its monopoly of power, the CCP is a huge … Continue reading

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