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Cadence Column

Cadence Column: Asia, June 12, 2017


Cadence

Cadence

Most of the news this week was rehashed hype. North Korea is making progress with missiles. This is nothing new. The US presence in South Korea is controversial among South Koreans. This is nothing new. But, the reminders keep coming in and politics never misses opportunity.

South Korea’s new president, Moon, is undergoing his own freshmen shake-ups. His military people didn’t tell him the whole story. US anti-missile systems, namely THADD, put out a lot of juice, having incredibly strong radars that no ham radio operator would be allowed to own. People don’t like living near them.

Two are already in place and are going to stay there. More, reportedly four, are at a US military base in South Korea, can be deployed at any time, and they are going to stay there. Security is not diminishing in South Korea, it is just not progressing as quickly as was scheduled.

The new Korean president is listening to his voters. He wants any additional missile defense systems in places that won’t slow-cook his own people. The delay seems to agree with China’s objection to the far-reaching THADD radars snooping on its own turf. Washington would have us think that South Korea is selling-out to the Chinese. And, China surely will get a big head over this, thinking that their economic threats against South Korea for defending itself against a loose-nuke cannon—that China funds—is finally having sway.

The real story is that time is running out in the “logistics” calculation. The US Navy is waiting. South Korea is irritated and can’t and won’t deploy endless missile defense systems. A China-backed dictator needs to be taken out. China knows it. Trump knows it. And, the Trump-Xi “bromancers” wish they could get North Korea dealt with quickly so they can take off the gloves over the South Sea.

There, in the South Sea, no lie Trump may have told about former director Comey could be as big as the lie Xi told about China’s man-made islands: They won’t be militarized. If the same islands aren’t being militarized then the anti-missile defense systems in South Korea are actually gumball machines and the US Navy is only in South Korean waters to throw a pizza party, which means that China has nothing to fear.

But, the truth is different from how slow-moving takeovers get glossed-over.

The press is moving against China and South Korea more and more, especially with “life inside” and other pro-democracy stories. China’s view is also about logistics. They lack food. China doesn’t have enough land to grow food for its own people. News stories from other countries put China in a worse light than is appropriate.

China’s solution is to expand. But, the Chinese don’t seem to understand the Western concept of expansion: Master what you have first; if you can’t manage your house as it stands, making it bigger will only grow the problem.

Now, China’s silk road is up against ISIS, making a third battle-front for the Chinese. And, after all that bravado against the US, the Philippines are welcoming US troops to help deal with their own ISIS problems. Don’t think that US- South Korean relations are down in the least.

North Korea fires missile that lands in sea near Russia | Yahoo – Reuters

Head of U.S. missile defense says North Korea missile advances a ‘great concern’ | Business Insider – Reuters

South Korea suspends THAAD missile system | Telegraph

South Korea Suspends THAAD Deployment | Popular Mechanics

Lawmakers: China gaining influence over US allies | Examiner

US forces back Philippine troops in Islamist held city | Yahoo – AFP

China Breaks Promise, Starts Arming Its Fake “Islands” | Popular Mechanics

Pakistan scrambles to protect China’s “Silk Road” pioneers | Channel News Asia

Life

What it’s like living in North Korea — according to a North Korean defector | Business Insider

China has an alarming food problem — and there’s only one way to fix it | Business Insider

Floating solar farm reflects China’s clean energy ambitions | Japan Times

China pollution: Survey finds 70% of firms break regulations | BBC

Wukan: The end of a democratic uprising in China | Aljazeera

Source: Pacific Daily Times
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About pacificdailytimes

Pacific journalism. …to help people understand each other daily by delivering periodical journalism that is relevant, usable, and inspiring to countries that touch the Pacific Ocean.

Discussion

One thought on “Cadence Column: Asia, June 12, 2017

  1. Reblogged this on World Peace Forum.

    Like

    Posted by daveyone1 | June 12, 2017, 11:56 pm

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